Chinese Language Training for Foreign Students    
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New Program: A Series Of Courses In English

A series of English courses----China: past and present----is to be offered at CIE (the College of International Education) of Capital Normal University. The program is intended for international students who can understand English. There are four courses in the program - Ancient Chinese History, Chinese History from the mid-19th century to 1949, Contemporary Chinese society, Anthropology and Chinese Culture. The teachers offering the courses are mostly from America and are experts in China past and present. All undergraduate students from English-speaking countries and all Chinese undergraduates with the required level in English are welcome to select the program.
Students can get credits from the program. Besides the courses taught in English, foreign students may also select Chinese courses according to their own level in Chinese and get credits accordingly.
Detailed requirements are as follows:

Courses taught in English

 

Ancient Chinese History

Chinese History from

mid-19th century to 1949

Contemporary

Chinese Society

Anthropology

and Chinese Culture

Instructor

Assistant Professor

Kurt Selles

Assistant Professor

Kurt Selles

Prof. Zhang, Jie

Lecturer. Liu, Heng

Teaching language

English

English

English

English

Duration of course

2006/03/06-2006/06/30

2006/03/06-2006/06/30

2006/03/06-2006/06/30

2006/03/06-2006/06/30

Hours per week

2

2

2

2

Hours per semester

32

32

32

32

Credit

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

Tuition

$150 per credit (students should pay in RMB according to the current RMB exchange rate.)

Chinese courses

 

Chinese Grammar

Chinese

Speaking

Chinese

Writing

Chinese

Listening comprehension

Chinese

Reading

Instructor

*

*

*

*

*

Teaching language

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Chinese

Duration

of course

2006/02/28-

2006/06/30

2006/02/028-

2006/06/30

2006/02/28-

2006/06/30

2006/02/28-2006/06/30

2006/02/28-

2006/06/30

Hours

per week

10/8/6 *

 

6

4/2 *

4/2 *

2

Hours

Per semester

170/136/102 *

 

102

68/34 *

68/34 *

34

Credit

10/8/6 *

6

4/2 *

4/2 *

2

Tuition

$60 per credit (students should pay in RMB according to the current RMB exchange rate.)

(* different instructors for different levels)


 

ATTACHMENTS: 1.PRESENTATION OF COURSES
             2.PRESENTATION OF INSTRUCTORS


COURSE 1.
Contemporary Chinese Society
Zhang Jie, Ph.D., Professor
Tel:716 878 6425
e-mail: ZHANGJ@BuffaloState.edu

1.Course Introduction: A Comparative Perspective

2.Confucianism: The Foundation of Chinese Culture

3.Collectivism and Individualism

4.Chinese Social Structure: Government

5.Chinese Social Structure: Economy

6.Chinese Social Structure: Family

7.Chinese Social Structure: Education

8.Chinese Social Structure: Community

9.Chinese Language and Chinese Culture

10.Clothing, Eating, Shelter, and Transportation in China

11.Equality and Inequality

12.Ethnic Relations

13.Women in China

14.The Criminal Justice System in China: Freedom, Democracy, Human Rights
and Privacy

15.Cultural Differences and Similarities: Human Nature, Perception of Beauty,
 Morality

16.Conclusion and Final Exam


COURSE 2

Traditional China

Kurt Selles, Assistant Professor Ph.D.
Phone 8610-6841-2494 •
E-mail kselles@calvin.edu


This course surveys the history of Chinese civilization from prehistory to 1600. Emphasis will be on broad themes of intellectual, political, and cultural currents and basic questions of development and interpretation. 

Course Requirements:

1.Attendance and Participation.  Attendance is mandatory for a simple reason: a substantial amount of material not contained in the reading will be introduced in lectures. Students are responsible for all material covered in class. Absences will not be permitted except under extraordinary circumstances. Student participation is encouraged and expected, as classroom discussion is a vital part of learning, understanding and evaluating new material.  (10%)

2.Reading.  The texts for this class have been selected carefully, for historical value and for economy of presentation. Please make sure that you complete the assigned reading prior to each class session. 
Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook
_______________, The Cambridge Illustrated History of China, and
“Course Readings” booklet (CRB).

3.Short Writing Assignments. Students will submit two short (3-4 pages) essays. These exercises are designed to help you synthesize and absorb reading materials. Specific instructions for these assignments will be distributed and discussed in class.  (30% each) 

4.Late Policy.  Because we’ll be moving along at a fast clip, you’ll need to keep on top of your paper assignments. I can’t afford to get behind, and neither can you. Consequently, I won’t be able to accept late papers without a penalty. Your grade will be marked down one letter-grade per day late. 

5.Office hours.  I have an office in room 704 of the CNU dormitory. Please feel free to stop by to chat about paper topics, topics related to China, language study, etc. The best time for you to see me is Mondays through Fridays, between 2:00 and 5:00 PM. You can also call me at home, but please don’t call after 10:00 p.m., unless it’s an emergency. 

6.Final Exam. 

Lecture Topics:
 
1.The Shang Dynasty

2.The Zhou Dynasty

3.Confucianism

4.The Warring States Period

5.Daoism

6.Mencius and Xunzi

7.The Qin Dynasty

8.The Han Dynasty

9.Buddhism

10.The Three Kingdoms Period

11.Sui and Tang Dynasties

12.The Song Dynasty

13.The Yuan Dynasty

14.Western Visitors to China

15.The Ming Dynasty


COURSE 3
Modern China

Kurt Selles, Assistant Professor Ph.D.
Phone 8610-6841-2494
E-mail kselles@calvin.edu

Course Requirements:

1.Attendance and Participation.  Attendance is mandatory for a simple reason: a substantial amount of material not contained in the reading will be introduced in lectures. Students are responsible for all material covered in class. Absences will not be permitted except under extraordinary circumstances. Student participation is encouraged and expected, as classroom discussion is a vital part of learning, understanding and evaluating new material.  (10%)

2.Reading.  The texts for this class have been selected carefully, for historical value and for economy of presentation. Please make sure that you complete the assigned reading prior to each class session. 
Patrica Ebrey, Cambridge Illustrated History of Chinese History
Patricia Buckley Ebrey, Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook
 “Course Readings” booklet.

3.Short Writing Assignments.  Every other week students will submit a short (3-4 page) essay. These exercises are designed to help you synthesize and absorb reading materials. Specific instructions for these assignments will be distributed and discussed in class.  (30% each) 

4.Late Policy.  Because we’ll be moving along at a fast clip, you’ll need to keep on top of your paper assignments. I can’t afford to get behind and neither can you. Consequently, I won’t be able to accept late papers without a penalty. Your grade will be marked down one letter-grade per day late. 

5.Office hours.  I’ll be in the office (704) most days until five. Please feel free to stop by to chat about paper topics, topics related to China, language study, etc. Your best bet is to call me before you come. You can also call me at home, but please don’t call after 10:00 p.m. unless it’s an emergency. 

6.Final Exam.  Friday, November 11, 10:10-11:50 p.m. (30%)


Lecture Topics:
 
1.The Rise of the Qing

2.The Kangxi Emperor

3.The Qianlong Emperor

4.Qing High Culture

5.Qing Common People

6.Foreign Intrusion

7.The Taiping Uprising

8.The Boxer Rebellion

9.The Fall of the Qing

10.The May Fourth Movement

11.The United Front

12.The War with Japan

13.World War II

14.The Founding of the People’s Republic of China

15.The 1950s-1970s

16.Opening and Reform

             

COURSE 4

Anthropological Studies and Chinese Culture
Lecturer: Dr. Liu Heng
Tel: 8610-68909551
e-mail: liuheng@mail.cnu.edu.cn

Course description
This course looks at Chinese culture, tradition and society through the study of anthropology. Anthropology carries out its field work in comparatively isolated communities in order to penetrate deeper into the social organization, economic system, religion and other aspects of the cultural mechanisms inherited by those under study. Anthropological studies will provide students with the tools they need to decode the complexity of Chinese culture without national prejudices. In addition, understanding Chinese culture from the perspective of anthropology will help to foster a sense of cultural relativism as well as to eliminate frictions between “us” and “the others”. Furthermore, a case study conducted by the lecturer himself in Yunnan province will be cited in the course to give students a vivid insight into Chinese culture.


Content
1.Course description
2.Understanding anthropology: some basic concepts
3.Subject fields, history and methodology
4.The localization of anthropology in China
5.Prof. Fei Xiaotong(费孝通): a famous anthropologist in China
6.Prof. Fei’s outstanding academic achievements and his influence
7.Francis L. K. Hsu (Xu Langguang)(许?光) and his Under the Ancestor’s Shadow
8.Yang Qingkun(杨庆?)and his Religion in Chinese Society
9.A case study: the religion of a Yunnan province community
10.A case study: traditional culture and festivals of this community
11.A case study: the meaning of ritual performances in this community & symbolic actions of human beings
12.A case study: “Gusana”, the pilgrims’ pilgrimage
13.An approach to understanding Chinese culture and society: a comparative perspective
14.Chinese culture from the viewpoint of anthropology
15.Review of the course

Course Format: Lecture, Discussion of readings, Videos if possible

Student Assignments/Criteria for Grading:
Presentation 30%
Class Participation/Discussion 10%
Final Paper 60%

Bibliography will be available within a few days.


INTRODUCTION OF INSTRUCTORS

INSTRUCTOR 1.
Dr. Zhang Jie started his teaching career at Beijing Institute of Chemical Technology from January 1082 after graduated with a BA degree from Shandong University in English Language and Literature. Four years later in 1986, he went to the United States for further education. He obtained a graduate certificate of Teaching English as a Second Language in 1987 and then a MA in Linguistics in 1988. In 1991, he earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Brigham Young University.

Dr. Zhang is now a tenured professor at State University of New York College at Buffalo. He teaches at the Department of Sociology and at the same time directs the Center for China Studies. Meanwhile, Dr. Zhang is a Ph.D. students mentor at Shandong University School of Public Health, visiting professor at Beijing Normal University College of Psychology, Dalian Medical University, Xi’an International Studies University, Central University of Finance and Economics, Central South University. He is life time member of the Western Returned Scholars Association and its Honorary Overseas Board Director, and senior adviser for the China Council for Promotion of Applied Technology with Foreign Countries. As an overseas delegate to the Chinese People’s Political Consultation Council, Dr. Zhang was invited to attend its national congress for the first time March 1-12, 2002.

Dr. Zhang teaches social psychology, criminology, sociological classical theories, social medicine, and sociology of mental health. He received the Buffalo State President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2002 and SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service in 2005.

For research, Dr. Zhang is a lead scholar among Chinese American researchers in the area of mental health and suicide prevention. He is currently the Principal Investigator for a research project in Liaoning and Hunan with funds granted by the US National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Zhang has published books in both English and Chinese and has dozens of articles printed in top journals in the world. As a scholar, Dr. Zhang has often been invited to lecture overseas.

INSTRUCTOR 2

 

115 Hua Qiao Gong Yu • Hua Yuan Cun • Beijing 100044 • China

Phone 8610-6841-2494 • E-mail kselles@calvin.edu

Kurt D. Selles

Professional experience

 

1999-  Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Mich./Beijing, China

Assistant Professor, History Department/Off-Campus Programs, China Semester, Director

§         China Semester Program: Established and direct it.

§         History classes: Traditional China, Modern China, Emerging China, and Tibet.

§         Student internships in China: placement and supervision.

§         Summer Student Program. Established and direct it.

Cultural Studies Programs in cooperation with the Comparative Literature Department at Capital Normal University, Beijing: Faculty exchanges on literature, development of a resource reading room, and planning of an international conference on literature. 

 

1987-   1997

§         Peking University, Instructor, Philosophy Department: Western Civilization.

§         English Language Institute/China: Personnel Officer

§         Beijing Institute of Technology, English Language Teacher

§         Mandarin language study

 

 

Education

 

BA English, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Mich.

M.A. Theology, Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Mich.

MA History, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

Ph.D. History, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.

 

 

INSTRUCTOR 3

Liu Heng, Master of Arts in English Language and Literature, Ph.D. in Cultural AnthropologyLecturer in the Department of English Language and Literature, specializing in anthropology and Cross-Cultural Studies.

 
 
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